• LUNCH m-f 11:30 am - 2:00 pm
  • DINNER m-sat 5:30 pm - 10:30 pm
  • 375 Pharr Rd. Atlanta, GA 30305
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About Taka

Chef Taka Moriuchi

Chef Taka Moriuchi

Taka Moriuchi was born in Hiroshima, Japan in 1962 and as a teenager, he dreamt of coming to the US. After graduating from high school, Taka worked as a sales rep for a shoe retail company called “Ginza Esperanza”. He went on to become a manager and merchandiser for the company, designing pumps and traveling to Europe every six months.

Taka left the shoe company after 10 years and bought a convenience store in Tokyo.

He soon learned of an opportunity for a lottery green card from a friend living in Atlanta, GA. He applied and was fortunately selected out of 240,000 applicants. Taka realized his dream of coming to the US on February 15, 1995.

Taka’s first job on American soil was as the assistant manager at Kobe steaks, where his responsibilities ranged from washing dishes and bussing tables to greeting guests. He quickly realized that sushi was becoming a popular trend in America, so he left his management position behind to learn the craft of sushi-making.

Taka began practicing the art of sushi at Soto when Soto opened his sushi restaurant in August 1995. He stayed on with the flourishing restaurant for four years before partnering with Kevin Rathbun to open Bluepointe in 1999. In February of 2002, Taka started his own restaurant known as “Taka Sushi Café.”

Taka’s revered sushi restaurant took on the “sushiandpassion” tagline in 2007. What is sushiandpassion? It is inspired by Barry Manilow’s famous song “Copacabana” in which he sings of “Music and Passion.”

As an avid Barry Manilow fan, Taka felt that Manilow’s perseverance mirrored his own. During a concert, he was impassioned by the message the Manilow shared with the crowd: “You can give in, give out. But don’t give up.” Since becoming the sole owner of Taka Sushi in 2006, Taka’s restaurant has become a renowned Buckhead dining establishment with celebrity patrons from Hollywood actors and professional athletes to musicians and TV personalities: John Travolta, the Dixie Chicks, Kiss, Matt Kuchar, Ian Poulter, Luke Donald, Dallas Austin, Jake Gyllenhaal and more. Taka plans to enjoy his success on the beaches of Waikiki, where he plans to retire one day.

 

  • About Taka Slider
    “Sheltered from the local party scene by a row of upscale salons,
    this small sushi restaurant resembles a sleepy Gulf Coast seafood shack.”

    City Search

    Rated 5.0/5.0 star
  • About Taka Slider
    “I eat at Taka a lot because it is around the corner and I just can’t stand
    how pretentious Soto is. Tonight was darn good and I just had to write
    about it. We had the Thai style red snapper sashimi which came with
    pine nuts, cilantro, shredded daikon/shizo mixture, and peanut
    sauce..so tasty.”

    The Blissful Glutton

    Published by The Blissful Glutton on September 15, 2005 at 8:47 PM
  • About Taka Slider
    “In a world where oceans of fish dishes are done in paint-by-numbers style,
    Takao Moriuchi maintains a beautiful touch.”

    “Sushi As Artistry” By Meridith Ford, Access Atlanta

    Published by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on October 26, 2004
  • About Taka Slider
    “Taste sushi as it was meant to be: pristine, pure, fresh.
    This intimate cafe from chef-owner Taka Moriuchi, a native of Hiroshima,
    specializes in sushi, but offers a wide range of hot and cold appetizers.”

    Gayot

    Rated 14/20
  • About Taka Slider
    “Taka takes his appetizer cues from his days at Soto.
    The list is extensive and the flavors unusual but mostly well-balanced,
    though I find I’m more taken with the sashimi
    and cold starters than I am with the hot.”

    Bill Addison, Creative Loafing

    Published March 5, 2003
  • About Taka Slider
    “Sushi in Atlanta = Taka Sushi Cafe for me. They have the freshest fish. Sashimi is really the best here, but the rolls are good too.”

    City Voter

  • About Taka Slider
    “This Buckhead sushi den attracts laid back locals (often toting mini sushi proteges).
    Remember where you are with a Home Depot or Diet Coke roll (flip the menu for translation).
    Go beyond creative names with noodles or a cold salad of snow crab and thinly sliced cucumber.
    Wall colors change annually to redefine the mood of the season, but the fresh food stays perfectly the same.”

    Black Book

  • About Taka Slider
    “A longtime fan of American music and culture, Taka Moriuchi was ecstatic when he won
    a lottery green card to come to the United States in 1995. While learning English,
    he worked his way up from being a busboy at Kobe Steaks
    to become the sushi chef at Soto Japanese restaurant, then BluePointe.
    Now, he’s the owner of this upscale sushi joint, located in the Buckhead building
    formerly occupied by Taco Mac.”
    City Guide AOL

    Rated 4.0/5.0 stars
  • About Taka Slider
    “Sushi chef has way with words
    Taka Sushi Cafe in Buckhead gets less of my business than I’d prefer.
    We’ve got sushi we like closer to home and are creatures of habit.
    But every time we visit, I am always reminded of what
    a thoughtful chef owner Taka Moriuchi is,
    both for his sushi bar creations and his hot food.”

    “What’s For Dinner?” By John Kessler, AJC Evening Edge

    Published by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on April 03, 2008

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To Make Reservations

We are happy to accommodate parties of any size. To make your reservation, please call 404-869-2802 or email sushiandpassion@gmail.com.

If you would prefer to make your reservation online, you can do so through OpenTable.

*NOTE: Please call 404-869-2802 to make reservations for parties of 6 or more.

Contact Information

Come visit our restaurant located in Buckhead, Atlanta, Georgia. With a beautiful restaurant and patio, Taka sushiandpassion of Atlanta is one of Georgia’s hidden treasures.

  • Lunch: Monday – Friday 11:30am to 2pm
  • Dinner: Monday – Saturday 5:30pm to 10:00pm
  • Sunday Closed
  • Happy Hour Specials
  • Daily from 5:30pm to 7pm
  • Special prices on beer, wine and sake.

 

SushiandPassion

Taka Update April 16, 2014

 Taka Update April 16, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ Tuna is same like last week. Yellow fin tuna is available and can get big eye tuna sometimes but it is Ok tuna and no toro in it. Many people are expecting Negitoro-Don but I cannot make it. So, toro means Blue fin Oh-toro only. This is farmed in Australia and frozen. Some people like this one and I just sell it. To be honest, this oh-toro is not my standard. Other restaurants buy Fresh farmed blue fin tuna from Japan or buy farmed other places blue fin. I tasted those before but those were also not my standard. I really feel the X-Day is coming near future. X-Day? The end of wild tuna supply.  Many people say “Don’t say that.” But it will come and I feel it.  I ‘ve been selling tuna for 18 years and I can tell.

☆ Uni supply is getting better. I have some and still buy from Japan. So, I have uni almost every day but not much quantity.

☆  Ocean Trout (Rainbow Trout) is not available this week because of bad quality. It was not fresh and we returned.

☆ Japanese Fish Omakase is 4 kinds of items. I have Isaki ( Three line Grunt), Kurodai (Black Porgy), Teen Seabass and Hobo (Sea Robin). They are all white fish.

☆ I made a new ramen. This is dipping style and the sauce is sesame miso flavor.

☆ Masters was over. Sorry for Kuchar. Looking forward to see the victory next year.

 

Closed Info

☆ May 25th – 29th . This is my first vacation of the year. I will go to Hawaii for a short trip. It is only 3 nights but OK. It is still good escape for me.

 

Vitamin E: a skin-boosting antioxidant that plays many roles in the body

Like vitamins A and C, vitamin E is an important antioxidant whose primary role in the body is to scavenge free radicals. Free radicals (which are produced by air and water pollution, cigarette smoke, radiation and the consumption of processed foods) are rogue atoms or atomic groups that have lost at least one electron, forcing them to steal electrons from neighboring molecules in the hope of stabilizing themselves. Unsurprisingly, this causes havoc in the body. In fact, unchecked free radical activity is a leading cause of accelerated aging as well as degenerative diseases like cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease and cataracts. Since vitamin E can neutralize these free radicals, it can help prevent these serious diseases while ensuring that our skin remains smooth and radiant (this is why vitamin E is added to so many skin care products).

Vitamin E plays large number of roles in our cardiovascular systems. Firstly, it aids red blood cell formation, ensuring that our tissues receive enough oxygen (which, in turn, guards us from anemia). Secondly, it thins the blood by widening our blood vessels, preventing our platelets from clumping together and creating clots. Thirdly, it prevents “bad” LDL cholesterol from being oxidized, which prevents clogged arteries. For these reasons, high levels of vitamin E in the body have been linked to reductions in non-fatal heart attacks and strokes in subjects. Vitamin E is also shown to reduce complications relating to diabetes.

Like most other vitamins, especially the B vitamins, vitamin E helps maintain cell function. For example, vitamin E can aid cell differentiation — a process of turning generic cells into the specific types of cells our bodies need, resulting in improved cell communication. Of course, proper cell communication is essential if we want our bodies to maintain proper immune function, heal damaged tissues and perform countless other tasks correctly. Additionally, vitamin E is associated with gene regulation, meaning it helps moderate the performance and production of certain enzymes, proteins and hormones in our bodies.

Vitamin E is contained in Tofu, Spinach, Almond, Sun flower seeds, Avocado, Shrimp, rainbow trout, Olive oil, Broccoli, Squash and others. See this site in detail. http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/vitamin-E.php
 

Taka Update April 10, 2014

 Taka Update April 10, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ Tuna supply is not great. I have yellow fin tuna only so far. I can get big eye tuna bit just red meat, no toro at all.

☆ Uni is also not easy. I finally ordered it from Japan. The price is high but better than no uni sitiation.

☆ Japanese Fish Omakase is 4 kinds. Blue nose is really good.

☆ A new dish for tuna.  I make tuna sashimi with tomato sauce. It is good for spring.

☆ Masters is just started. I will come on Sunday.

 

Closed Info

☆ May 25th – 29th . This is my first vacation of the year. I will go to Hawaii for a short trip. It is only 3 nights but OK. It is still good escape for me.\

 

Mediterranean Diet Cuts Type 2 Diabetes Risk by a Third

A Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) cut the risk for developing type 2 diabetes by about a third among adults at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with a low-fat diet, a new analysis finds.

The results, from the subgroup of subjects in the Spanish cardiovascular prevention study Prevencion con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) who did not have diabetes at baseline, were published January 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine by Jordi Salas-Salvado, MD, PhD, from Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Reus, Spain, and colleagues.

“The PREDIMED trial provides strong evidence that long-term adherence to a Mediterranean diet supplemented with EVOO without energy restrictions…results in a substantial reduction in the risk for type 2 diabetes among older persons with high cardiovascular risk,” Dr. Salas-Salvado and colleagues write.

The Mediterranean diet is high in fat (30% to 40% of total calories) from vegetable sources such as olive oil and nuts and relatively low in dairy products. The diet also commonly includes sauces with tomato, onions, garlic, and spices and moderate wine consumption.

“Of note, this dietary pattern is palatable and has a high potential for long-term sustainability, with obvious public-health implications for primary prevention of diabetes,” the investigators write.

Commenting on the study for Medscape Medical News, William S. Yancy Jr, MD, associate professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, said that the findings demonstrate overall benefit for the Mediterranean diet, but not necessarily in comparison with a true low-fat diet.

“These results are fairly convincing that the Mediterranean diet prevents the onset of diabetes compared with a usual diet,” he observed, noting that the “low-fat” diet used in the study was actually closer to a “usual diet” because adherence to the low-fat diet in the study’s control arm wasn’t good.

“The Mediterranean diet may ultimately be found to be healthier than a low-fat diet, but this study did not effectively test that,” said Dr. Yancy, whose research focus is obesity and nutrition.

Nonetheless, he believes the study lends support to a Mediterranean diet prescription. “It may not be definitive, but it is a very reasonable recommendation, because we are not aware of any harms from the Mediterranean diet — except maybe cost or lack of familiarity/convenience to Americans — and there is a growing body of evidence showing its benefits,” he told Medscape Medical News.

Read more?  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/818683

 
Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TakaSushiAtlanta

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Taka Update March 27, 2014

 Taka Update March 27, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ I have a good big eye tuna again. It was 58lbs and the one of the biggest tuna ever.     It is getting mature and time to eat.

☆ Uni is not easy. It was sold out yesterday. And a pack is coming today. I am not sure for tomorrow delivery.

☆ Japanese Fish Omakase was Porgy and Opal Eye only.

☆ Ocean Trout came back. I made carpaccio style sashimi salad and people loved it.

☆ 2 weeks for Masters, are you ready? I am ready.

☆ I went to see the cardiology doctor for checking. My heart was very good condition. The only problem was cholesterol. But it was minor. I need tto drop 20 points and lose 5 lbs. of weight. And I need exercise to because I am fat. Yes, I am fat.

 

Closed Info

☆ April 7th Monday Dinner will be closed. I need to go to Augusta for Masters. This is my Tradition of Masters Monday and my tiny spring break.

☆ May 25th – 29th . This is my first vacation of the year. I will go to Hawaii for a short trip. It is only 3 nights but OK. It is still good escape for me.\

 

Why pomegranate is good for you

Pomegranate juice may improve blood flow to the heart in people with ischemic coronary heart disease (CHD). In a study of 45 people with CHD and myocardial ischemia (in which not enough blood gets to the heart muscle), participants who drank about 8 fluid ounces of pomegranate juice daily for 3 months had less ischemia during a stress test. Study participants who did not drink the juice, meanwhile, had evidence of more stress-induced ischemia. The study noted no negative effects to drinking pomegranate juice (even on blood sugar levels or body weight). Lead researcher, Dean Ornish, MD, believes pomegranate juice may even be able to help prevent heart disease in people who do not already have it.

 

Pomegranate juice may help stop plaque from building up in blood vessels – in other words, it may have an anti-atherogenic effect. The antioxidants in the juice may help keep cholesterol in a form that is less damaging, and may also reduce plaque that has already built up in vessels, according to Collins. Pomegranate juice was shown to have potent anti-atherogenic effects in healthy humans and in mice with plaque buildup — possibly due to its antioxidative properties, researchers from Israel recently concluded. In their study of healthy male volunteers, pomegranate juice was shown to decrease the likelihood of LDL “bad” cholesterol to form plaque. Another Israeli study showed a decrease in the development of atherosclerosis in mice whose diets were supplemented with pomegranate juice.

 

Pomegranate juice may slow prostate cancer growth. Antioxidants are known to help prevent and repair DNA damage that can lead to cancer. “Pomegranate juice won’t fend off cancer by itself, but studies suggest it may be a wonderful addition to the balanced, plant-based diet recommended by the American Institute of Cancer Research,” says Collins. Men who have already had preliminary treatment for prostate cancer may benefit from a daily dose of pomegranate juice. The juice appeared to suppress the growth of cancer cells and the increase in cancer cell death in lab testing, according to research from UCLA. Allan Pantuck, MD, said in an email interview that he guesses a combination of elements in pomegranates — rather than any single component — is probably responsible for these health effects.

Yes, more research needs to be done on pomegranate juice for us to know anything definitive about its benefits. But, so far, the future looks bright for this vibrant, fuchsia-colored fruit.

 
Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TakaSushiAtlanta

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Taka Update March 19, 2014

Taka Update March 19, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ I have a good big eye tuna so far. It will last until Friday, maybe.

☆ Uni is Spring Break Now. Please do not expect this weekend. Even divers cannot find it.

☆ I have Japanese Fish Omakase but it will be gone in a few days.

☆ Ocean Trout came yesterday but the color was not same as last time. Our supplier will send another one tomorrow.

☆ All other fish are fine. Spring is almost here. Fish supply is steady.

☆ Masters Décor is coming tomorrow. I will stay up late tonight and do it by myself.

 

Shochu Tasting

We are going to have Shochu Tasting on March 26th Wednesday night. Shochu is Japanese hard liquor and very popular in Japan. Actually it is more popular than sake. If you are interested in, contact us.

 

Closed Info

☆ April 7th Monday Dinner will be closed. I need to go to Augusta for Masters. This is my Tradition of Masters Monday and my tiny spring break.

☆ May 25th – 29th . This is my first vacation of the year. I will go to Hawaii for a short trip. It is only 3 nights but OK. It is still good escape for me.

 

As Weight Rises in People With Diabetes, So Does Death Risk: Study

Excess weight might increase the risk of premature death among people with type 2 diabetes, according to a large new study that could upend earlier research. And the heavier a person is, the greater their risk of dying early.

These latest findings call into question previous studies that found an “obesity paradox.” Those results suggested that being overweight might actually provide some protection from dying.

“We wanted to address the so-called obesity paradox,” said the study’s lead author, Deirdre Tobias, a research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health. “It seemed implausible.”

“In our much larger data set, I think this data supports the conclusion that the obesity paradox is a myth for those with type 2 diabetes,” Tobias said.

Being overweight or obese is a well-established risk factor for premature death from conditions such as heart disease or cancer, according to background information in the study. But with some chronic conditions, such as heart failure, kidney failure and type 2 diabetes, some studies have suggested that people who are overweight or obese have a lowered risk of death.

Previous research, however, often has been done with small sample sizes. These studies haven’t been able to control optimally for smoking and for other pre-existing diseases, according to the current study’s authors.

People with type 2 diabetes don’t make enough insulin or don’t use the hormone properly to convert the food they eat into energy. As a result, their blood-sugar levels are too high.

The current study — published Jan. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine — included more than 11,000 people with type 2 diabetes from the well-known Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. On average, their diabetes diagnoses occurred in their early 60s.

During nearly 16 years of follow-up, almost 3,100 people died, the researchers said. When they looked at the whole group, it appeared that being overweight or even slightly obese was less of a risk factor for dying than being normal weight. For example, someone with a body-mass index (BMI) — a rough estimate of body fat based on height and weight — between 27.5 and 29.9 was less likely to die than someone with a BMI between 18.5 and 22.4.

A normal BMI is between 18.5 and 24.9, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Between 25 and 29.9 is overweight, and over 30 is obese.

But when Tobias and her colleagues separated the data by smoking status, the obesity paradox disappeared for people who never smoked.

The researchers also looked at the data to see the relationship between BMI just before a diabetes diagnosis and deaths due to heart disease, cancer and other causes. They found that the higher the BMI, the greater the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease in those who never smoked.

“Smokers tend to be leaner, and that may attenuate the risk of obesity or even make it look protective,” Tobias said. “But when we stratified the data by smoking status, we saw the relationship is truly linear, with mortality risk going up with BMI.”

The bottom line: Being overweight or obese doesn’t confer a survival benefit on people with diabetes, Tobias said. “Weight management still remains an important component of type 2 diabetes management,” she said.

Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the clinical diabetes center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, agreed that the obesity paradox is a myth.

He said one of the reasons for so much conflicting information in studies is that using BMI alone as an indicator of weight status is insufficient.

“BMI doesn’t tell us how much bad fat a person has,” Zonszein said. “People have good fat and bad fat. It’s more important to know about the bad fat. You have to look at BMI, along with other cardiovascular disease risk factors [such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol]. That would be much more reliable.”

Based on current trends, the CDC estimates that by 2050 one in five Americans will have diabetes. Most people with diabetes have type 2, which is associated with being overweight and inactive.

 
Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TakaSushiAtlanta

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Taka Update March 13, 2014

 Taka Update March 13, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ We received Big eye tuna on Tuesday. It was almost same as last week one. Toro is not AAA, just A+ grade. I cannot say like “ This is the one of the best…”. 

☆ Uni is available but not much. But it will come this weekend.

☆ Ocean Trout (Rainbow Trout) was very popular last week. But it is not available this week. It will come on next Monday.

☆ Cheery Salmon was also very popular last week. It comes today. This seasonable item is really good and must try.

☆ Hotaru Ika (Fire fly squid-fresh) comes today and the last supply of the season.

☆ I am thinking stop selling Hawaiian fish for a while. People get bored, that’s I feel. Atlanta sushi market is not big and 6 months trial is enough. I might switch to Japanese fish Omakase. I did this fish omakase last year and people liked.

 

Closed Info

☆ April 7th Monday Dinner will be closed. I need to go to Augusta for Masters. This is my Tradition of Masters Monday and my tiny spring break.

☆ May 25th – 29th . This is my first vacation of the year. I will go to Hawaii for a short trip. It is only 3 nights but OK. It is still good escape for me.

 

Chocolate, Tea, Berries May Cut Diabetes Risk

A diet that includes substances found in chocolate, tea and berries could help protect people against diabetes and other diseases, new research shows.

The study included nearly 2,000 healthy women in the United Kingdom who completed a food questionnaire and were tested for blood sugar (glucose) regulation, inflammation and insulin resistance.

“Our research looked at the benefits of eating certain sub-groups of flavanoids. We focused on flavones, which are found in herbs and vegetables such as parsley, thyme and celery, and anthocyanins, found in berries, red grapes, wine and other red or blue-colored fruits and vegetables,” study leader Aedin Cassidy, of the University of East Anglia in England, said in a university news release.

The investigators found that consuming high levels of flavones and anthocyanins was associated with lower insulin resistance, better blood sugar regulation and lower levels of inflammation. Chronic inflammation is associated with diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and cancer.

The study was published Jan. 19 in the Journal of Nutrition.

“This is one of the first large-scale human studies to look at how these powerful bioactive compounds might reduce the risk of diabetes,” Cassidy said.

Earlier research that took place in laboratories suggested that these types of foods might affect blood sugar, which plays a role in type 2 diabetes risk, she noted. However, it was unknown how regular consumption of these ingredients might affect a person’s blood glucose and inflammation levels and insulin resistance, Cassidy said in the news release.

What remains unclear is exactly what amounts of these compounds are needed to reduce the risk of diabetes, the study authors added. Also unclear is how much of a health benefit the compounds really carry — the study found an association between consumption and seemingly better health but not cause-and-effect.

According to study co-author Tim Spector, of King’s College London, “This is an exciting finding that shows that some components of foods that we consider unhealthy like chocolate or wine may contain some beneficial substances. If we can start to identify and separate these substances we can potentially improve healthy eating,” he said in the news release.

 
Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TakaSushiAtlanta

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802