• LUNCH m-f 11:30 am - 2:00 pm
  • DINNER m-sat 5:30 pm - 10:30 pm
  • 375 Pharr Rd. Atlanta, GA 30305
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About Taka

Chef Taka Moriuchi

Chef Taka Moriuchi

Taka Moriuchi was born in Hiroshima, Japan in 1962 and as a teenager, he dreamt of coming to the US. After graduating from high school, Taka worked as a sales rep for a shoe retail company called “Ginza Esperanza”. He went on to become a manager and merchandiser for the company, designing pumps and traveling to Europe every six months.

Taka left the shoe company after 10 years and bought a convenience store in Tokyo.

He soon learned of an opportunity for a lottery green card from a friend living in Atlanta, GA. He applied and was fortunately selected out of 240,000 applicants. Taka realized his dream of coming to the US on February 15, 1995.

Taka’s first job on American soil was as the assistant manager at Kobe steaks, where his responsibilities ranged from washing dishes and bussing tables to greeting guests. He quickly realized that sushi was becoming a popular trend in America, so he left his management position behind to learn the craft of sushi-making.

Taka began practicing the art of sushi at Soto when Soto opened his sushi restaurant in August 1995. He stayed on with the flourishing restaurant for four years before partnering with Kevin Rathbun to open Bluepointe in 1999. In February of 2002, Taka started his own restaurant known as “Taka Sushi Café.”

Taka’s revered sushi restaurant took on the “sushiandpassion” tagline in 2007. What is sushiandpassion? It is inspired by Barry Manilow’s famous song “Copacabana” in which he sings of “Music and Passion.”

As an avid Barry Manilow fan, Taka felt that Manilow’s perseverance mirrored his own. During a concert, he was impassioned by the message the Manilow shared with the crowd: “You can give in, give out. But don’t give up.” Since becoming the sole owner of Taka Sushi in 2006, Taka’s restaurant has become a renowned Buckhead dining establishment with celebrity patrons from Hollywood actors and professional athletes to musicians and TV personalities: John Travolta, the Dixie Chicks, Kiss, Matt Kuchar, Ian Poulter, Luke Donald, Dallas Austin, Jake Gyllenhaal and more. Taka plans to enjoy his success on the beaches of Waikiki, where he plans to retire one day.

 

  • About Taka Slider
    “Sheltered from the local party scene by a row of upscale salons,
    this small sushi restaurant resembles a sleepy Gulf Coast seafood shack.”

    City Search

    Rated 5.0/5.0 star
  • About Taka Slider
    “I eat at Taka a lot because it is around the corner and I just can’t stand
    how pretentious Soto is. Tonight was darn good and I just had to write
    about it. We had the Thai style red snapper sashimi which came with
    pine nuts, cilantro, shredded daikon/shizo mixture, and peanut
    sauce..so tasty.”

    The Blissful Glutton

    Published by The Blissful Glutton on September 15, 2005 at 8:47 PM
  • About Taka Slider
    “In a world where oceans of fish dishes are done in paint-by-numbers style,
    Takao Moriuchi maintains a beautiful touch.”

    “Sushi As Artistry” By Meridith Ford, Access Atlanta

    Published by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on October 26, 2004
  • About Taka Slider
    “Taste sushi as it was meant to be: pristine, pure, fresh.
    This intimate cafe from chef-owner Taka Moriuchi, a native of Hiroshima,
    specializes in sushi, but offers a wide range of hot and cold appetizers.”

    Gayot

    Rated 14/20
  • About Taka Slider
    “Taka takes his appetizer cues from his days at Soto.
    The list is extensive and the flavors unusual but mostly well-balanced,
    though I find I’m more taken with the sashimi
    and cold starters than I am with the hot.”

    Bill Addison, Creative Loafing

    Published March 5, 2003
  • About Taka Slider
    “Sushi in Atlanta = Taka Sushi Cafe for me. They have the freshest fish. Sashimi is really the best here, but the rolls are good too.”

    City Voter

  • About Taka Slider
    “This Buckhead sushi den attracts laid back locals (often toting mini sushi proteges).
    Remember where you are with a Home Depot or Diet Coke roll (flip the menu for translation).
    Go beyond creative names with noodles or a cold salad of snow crab and thinly sliced cucumber.
    Wall colors change annually to redefine the mood of the season, but the fresh food stays perfectly the same.”

    Black Book

  • About Taka Slider
    “A longtime fan of American music and culture, Taka Moriuchi was ecstatic when he won
    a lottery green card to come to the United States in 1995. While learning English,
    he worked his way up from being a busboy at Kobe Steaks
    to become the sushi chef at Soto Japanese restaurant, then BluePointe.
    Now, he’s the owner of this upscale sushi joint, located in the Buckhead building
    formerly occupied by Taco Mac.”
    City Guide AOL

    Rated 4.0/5.0 stars
  • About Taka Slider
    “Sushi chef has way with words
    Taka Sushi Cafe in Buckhead gets less of my business than I’d prefer.
    We’ve got sushi we like closer to home and are creatures of habit.
    But every time we visit, I am always reminded of what
    a thoughtful chef owner Taka Moriuchi is,
    both for his sushi bar creations and his hot food.”

    “What’s For Dinner?” By John Kessler, AJC Evening Edge

    Published by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on April 03, 2008

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To Make Reservations

We are happy to accommodate parties of any size. To make your reservation, please call 404-869-2802 or email sushiandpassion@gmail.com.

If you would prefer to make your reservation online, you can do so through OpenTable.

*NOTE: Please call 404-869-2802 to make reservations for parties of 6 or more.

Contact Information

Come visit our restaurant located in Buckhead, Atlanta, Georgia. With a beautiful restaurant and patio, Taka sushiandpassion of Atlanta is one of Georgia’s hidden treasures.

  • Lunch: Monday – Friday 11:30am to 2pm
  • Dinner: Monday – Saturday 5:30pm to 10:00pm
  • Sunday Closed
  • Happy Hour Specials
  • Daily from 5:30pm to 7pm
  • Special prices on beer, wine and sake.

 

SushiandPassion

Taka Update July 11, 2014

 

 Taka Update July 11, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ I have low fat Big eye tuna for this weekend.

☆ Uni is not available. It will come next Thursday from Japan. This is the only route to get uni right now.

☆ I have King Salmon (NZ) and Ocean Trout (Norway) are not available this weekend.

 

Closed Info

☆ I am thinking to close Labor Day week. I will go back to Japan, maybe.  

 

Fruits and vegetables linked to stroke prevention

Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce stroke risk by almost a third, according to a fresh look at recent evidence.

The results support existing recommendations from organizations like the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which already call for a diet rich in fresh greens.

“The findings are consistent with the current knowledge that increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables should be encouraged to prevent stroke,” Dr. Yan Qu said in an email.

Qu, of the Qingdao Municipal Hospital and the Medical College of Qingdao University in Qingdao, China, led the analysis.

A stroke occurs when bloodflow to part of the brain is blocked by a clot or a burst blood vessel. Without emergency care, a stroke can lead to severe brain damage or death.

Stroke remains the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the CDC.

Several studies have looked at the influence of diet on stroke risk. Some have tied eating lots of fruits and vegetables to lowered risk; others have found no link at all.

The effect could be indirect, and eating fruits and vegetables may benefit overall health by reducing blood pressure, cholesterol, weight and other stroke risk factors, Qu said. It’s also possible that specific nutrients in the foods may reduce stroke risk, he said.

To get a better understanding of the relationship between stroke risk and plants in the diet, the researchers searched for reports from recent decades that tracked the eating habits and health of men and women around the world.

Twenty studies examining a total of 16,981 strokes among 760,629 participants were included in the analysis.

Overall, the people who ate the most fruits and vegetables were 21 percent less likely to have a stroke, compared to people who ate the lowest amounts, the researchers found.

The benefits rose along with the amounts of produce consumed. Stroke risk fell by 32 percent for every 200 grams (g) per day of fruit people ate, and 11 percent with every 200 g of vegetables.

The researchers found that citrus fruits, leafy vegetables and apples and pears were the specific types of greenery linked to reduced stroke risk.

“The effect of other types of fruit and vegetables on stroke risk still needs to be confirmed,” Qu said.

The researchers cannot say for certain that eating fruits and vegetables caused fewer strokes among the participants. They point out that there could be other factors that influence the results; for example, people who eat more fruits and vegetables may lead generally healthier lives.

“It doesn’t surprise me too much in that it seems to confirm what a lot of other studies have shown,” Dr. David A. Miller said.

Miller, who was not involved in the new study, directs the Advanced Primary Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida.

“We still don’t know if there is anything inherent in the fruits and vegetables or whether it’s their effect on blood pressure,” he said. “It’s a chicken and egg type of thing.”

Miller also pointed out that the researchers also found people who controlled their other risk factors – such as weight, smoking and overall diet – had the lowest risk of stroke.

“Eating fruits and vegetables is helpful, but it’s not the only thing,” he said.

 

Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

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Taka Update June 27, 2014

 Taka Update June 27, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ I have very good tuna this week. But it is almost gone. It is well mature now.

☆ Uni is sold out. It will come back next week. But the quality is getting bad.

☆ I have King Salmon (NZ)  is available. Ocean Trout is coming next week.

 

Closed Info

☆ July 4th is Friday. We will be closed. But we will be opened next day. I decided to play golf from July 4th- 6th, 3 days straight. This is my summer camp. Am I crazy? I have to work on 5th for dinner.

 

11 Proven Health Benefits of Chia Seeds

1. Chia Seeds Deliver a Massive Amount of Nutrients With Very Few Calories

2. Chia Seeds Are Loaded With Antioxidants

3. Almost All The Carbs in Them Are Fiber

4. Chia Seeds Are High in Quality Protein

5. Due to The High Fiber and Protein Content, Chia Seeds Should be Able to Help You Lose Weight

6. Chia Seeds Are High in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

7. Chia Seeds May Improve Certain Blood Markers, Which Should Lower The Risk of Heart Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

8. They Are High in Many Important Bone Nutrients

9. Chia Seeds Can Cause Major Improvements in Type 2 Diabetics

10. Chia Seeds Can Improve Exercise Performance as Much as a Sports Drink

11. Chia Seeds Are Easy to Incorporate Into Your Diet

Read more? http://authoritynutrition.com/11-proven-health-benefits-of-chia-seeds/

 

Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TakaSushiAtlanta

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Taka Update June 18. 2014

Taka Update June 18, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ I had Hawaiian big eye tuna on Monday. It was really bad and switched to Yellow  

       fin tuna.  A new big eye tuna is coming on Friday. I can expect toro.

☆ Uni supply  is negative. I can say no uni this weekend.

☆ I have 3 salmons, Scottish salmon, Ocean trout and King Salmon (NZ).

 

Closed Info

☆ July 4th is Friday. We will be closed. But we will be opened next day.

 

Kids’ Diabetes Rates Up Dramatically in 8 Years, Study Finds

Rates of diabetes in U.S. children have jumped sharply in just eight years, according to new research. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes increased 21 percent between 2001 and 2009. At the same time, rates of type 2 diabetes rose 30.5 percent, the study found. These increases affected both boys and girls, and nearly all racial groups, the researchers noted. The reasons behind the increases aren’t entirely clear, said lead researcher Dr. Dana Dabelea, the associate dean for faculty at the Colorado School of Public Health in Aurora. “While we do not completely understand the reasons for this increase, since the causes of type 1 diabetes are still unclear, it is likely that something has changed in our environment, both in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world, causing more youth to develop the disease, maybe at increasingly younger ages,” she said. Several reasons for the increase in type 2 diabetes are possible, Dabelea said. “Most likely is the obesity epidemic, but also the long-term effects of diabetes and obesity during pregnancy, which have also increased over time,” she noted. This report shows the increasingly important public health burden that pediatric diabetes represents, Dabelea pointed out. “It also highlights the facts that all racial/ethnic groups are affected by both major forms of diabetes,” she said. The report was scheduled to be published May 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with the May 3 presentation of the study findings at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Vancouver, Canada. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin, the hormone needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy. In type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But over time, it isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep blood sugar at normal levels. For the study, Dabelea’s team collected data on more than 3 million children and adolescents. When looking for type 1 diabetes, the researchers included people aged 19 years and younger. For type 2, the researchers limited the age range to 10 through 19 years. The incidence of type 2 in children younger than 10 was too low to provide statistically significant numbers, according to the report. The data came from five centers located in California, Colorado, Ohio, South Carolina, and Washington state, as well as from some American Indian reservations in Arizona and New Mexico. In 2001, type 1 diabetes had been diagnosed in just under 5,000 youngsters from a group of more than 3 million youth. By 2009, that number rose to almost 6,700, an increase of 21 percent, according to the study authors. The only groups that didn’t see an increase in type 1 diabetes were children from 0 to 4 years old, and American Indian children, the study revealed. For type 2, the researchers looked at a group of almost 2 million children. In 2001, 588 children and teens had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. By 2009, 819 kids and teens had type 2, a jump of 30.5 percent, the researchers found. The only ethnic groups that didn’t see an increase in type 2 were American Indians and Asian Pacific Islanders. “Historically, type 1 diabetes has been considered a disease that affects primarily white youth; however, our findings highlight the increasing burden of type 1 diabetes experienced by youth of minority racial/ethnic groups as well,” the authors wrote. The increase for both types of diabetes was seen among boys and girls and among whites, blacks and Hispanics. The biggest increase in both types of diabetes was among those 15 through 19 years of age, the researchers noted. Of the study, Dr. Robert Ratner, chief medical and scientific officer for the American Diabetes Association, said, “The overall prevalence of diabetes is going to grow progressively, because we’ve done so much better in keeping these people alive, they are going to live longer. We also know they are going to continue to incur costs for complications.” Diabetes will be a major health care problem over the next two decades, he predicted. “There is a need to pay more attention to the prevention of diabetes, because we are not going to be able to care for all of these people,” Ratner said. Ratner was perplexed by the increase in type 1 diabetes. “Whether it’s an interaction between genetics and environment that’s increasing autoimmunity — we really don’t know,” he said. “It’s a major question that needs to be answered.” Dr. Luis Gonzalez-Mendoza, director of pediatric endocrinology at Miami Children’s Hospital, was also concerned by the increase in type 1 diabetes. “Type 1 diabetes seems to be on the rise among teens, almost double what it used to be,” he said. “There is something that is acting as a trigger for the immune system to go crazy, because type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder.”

Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TakaSushiAtlanta

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Taka Update June 11, 2014

 Taka Update June 11, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ I have big eye tuna. This one is really good. Toro is also great chu-toro.

☆ Uni supply  is negative. It is quota. But we might get at the weekend.

☆ I have 3 salmons, Scottish salmon, Ocean trout and King Salmon (NZ).

 

Closed Info

☆ July 4th is Friday. We will be closed. But we will be opened next day.

 

Birth Defect Risk Affected By Father’s Diet, Study Suggests

What a father eats before conception may affect his baby’s risk of birth defects, suggests a new study on mice conducted by researchers from McGill University in Montreal.

The rate of birth defects was 28 per cent higher per litter of baby mice if their fathers were fed a diet deficient in vitamin B9 or folate compared to litters where both parents were fed a healthy diet, reported the study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.

Folate, found in leafy green vegetables, cereals, fruit, beans and liver, is known to prevent miscarriages and birth defects in humans if taken by the mother. Because of that, folate supplements are often recommended for women of childbearing age, especially if they are trying to become pregnant, and a lot of processed food is now enriched with folate. In men, folate deficiency is already known to reduce fertility.

However, many human populations, such as those in Canada’s North, still don’t have enough folate in their diets, said Sarah Kimmins, associate professor of reproductive biology at McGill and the senior author of the new study.

Recent research also suggest that obesity, which affects about 25 per cent of the Canadian population, can impact the way the body handles folate, reducing its absorption into the bloodstream.

Kimmins, who holds a Canada Research Chair in epigenetics, reproduction and development, noted that mice are genetically very similar to humans. She added that the mechanism that appears to link a father’s diet and his offspring’s health works the same among mice and humans.

 

Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TakaSushiAtlanta

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Taka Update June 04, 2014

 Taka Update June 04, 2014

Fish delivery and more

☆ I have big eye tuna but almost no fat. I gave up this tuna and used Blue fin oh-toro.

☆ Uni supply  is very good. I have it. And I will get more at the weekend.

☆ Japanese Fish Omakase is available. I will not buy this for next 2 months. It sounds  

        like same kinds of fish. So I just wait to see summer fish.

  •  King Salmon is coming back. I bought it from Hawaiian fish company. I can do

     salmon comparison.

 

Closed Info

☆ July 4th is Friday. We will be closed. But we will be opened next day.

 

The 12 fruits and vegetables most likely to be contaminated with pesticides
The Environmental Working Group is out with its annual “Dirty Dozen” list: a ranking of the conventionally grown fruits and vegetables that, based on an analysis of 32,000 samples tested by the USDA and the FDA, are most likely to be contaminated with pesticides.

Controversy abounds, however, over whether or not higher pesticide levels translate to a safety risk: the USDA, in its own annual pesticide report, found, as in years previous, that “U.S. food does not pose a safety concern based upon pesticide residues.” While “it’s true that most samples meet legal limits every year,” the EWG countered, “legal doesn’t always mean safe.”

There do remain doubts about the safety of pesticide residues, most notably in apples. In the United States, conventionally grown apples are commonly treated with DPA  – a chemical that the European Union, citing safety concerns, banned. More recently, the EU also strictly limited the amount of DPA allowed on imported apples — and since U.S. apples average four times the European limit, that means American apples are effectively banned from Europe. Citing this alarming fact, the EWG last week petitioned the EPA to halt its use of DPA on apples until more research is done. Reuters reported on the uncertainty surrounding the chemical:

The EPA is required under the federal Food Quality Protection Act to conduct a scientific assessment of pesticides every 15 years. But the Environmental Protection Agency has not looked at DPA since the late 1990s.

In its last report, the EPA said DPA was “not likely” to be carcinogenic, but said diphenylnitrosamine – an impurity of technical grade diphenylamine – was classified as a probable human carcinogen based on increased incidence of bladder tumors in rats. The agency also expressed concern about the “structural relationship to carcinogenic nitrosamines.”

The EPA said in a statement that its evaluation in 1997 found “reasonable certainty of no harm” and added that if new evidence challenges the safety of DPA, it will take action.

Critics also argue that the EWG’s list sends the wrong message to consumers by prioritizing trace amounts of pesticides over the demonstrably great benefit of eating more fruits and vegetables, the organic versions of which aren’t always available or affordable to consumers. EWG, for the record, agrees that “eating conventionally-grown produce is far better than not eating fruits and vegetables at all.” However, it contends that consumers have the right to know when they might mitigate any potential risk by buying organic. And unsurprisingly, apples top this year’s list of conventionally grown produce to consider avoiding:

Apples Strawberries Grapes Celery Peaches Spinach Sweet bell peppers

Nectarines (imported) Cucumbers Cherry tomatoes Snap peas (imported)

Potatoes

And, on the other end of things, here are the “clean 15″ — the ones that, even when not organic, the group says host the fewest chemicals:

Sweet potatoes Cauliflower Cantaloupe Grapefruit Eggplant Kiwi

Papaya Mangoes Asparagus Onions Sweet peas – frozen Cabbage

Pineapples Sweet corn Avocados

 

Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

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Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802